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  • Top 10 FAQ's

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  1. What's the difference between TEFL and TESOL?
  2. Do I need a degree to do the course?
  3. What type of people take an online course?
  4. I am a non-native English speaker - can I do one of your courses?
  5. Help! I’m stuck on a question, what do I do?
  6. What type of assignments are there?
  7. How is my work assessed?
  8. When can I start and when do I receive the course?
  9. If I’m not satisfied or change my mind, do I get my money back?
  10. After the course, do I get a certificate and any help in terms of my job search?
  11. Is there a maximum time limit for course completion?
  12. How quickly can I do a Global English course?
  13. Can I start the course here and take it abroad to finish it?
  14. Do I have to speak a second language to be able to teach English overseas?
  15. Can I call to book a weekend course?
  16. If I book online, will I get a confirmation?
  17. Can I change my booking once I have made it?
  18. Can I cancel my booking?
  19. Do I have to make payment in full?
  20. Do you have a cancellation list?
  21. Who runs the weekend courses?
  22. Can I start my online course before my weekend programme?
  23. What certificates do I get when I finish?
  24. How big are the weekend classes – how many students are there?
  25. What qualification will I get?
  26. Can I apply for a job as soon as I pass the course?
  27. Will there be help in finding a job?
  28. How long has Global English been going?
  29. Planning an Engagement and Free Practice activity
  30. Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity
  31. Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity
  32. Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity
  33. Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity
  34. Lexis for an Upper-Intermediate level group
  35. Irregular Past Tense Lesson Plan (including Verb Pelmanism)
  36. Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity
  37. Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity
  38. Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity
  39. Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity
  40. Testing New Students - Grammar, Fluency, Pronunciation and Vocabulary
  41. Course Design for a Business English 1-1 Student
  42. Essay on the Future: Tense or Aspect?
  43. Lesson Plan for Prefixes and Suffixes
  44. Lesson Plan for Present Perfect Simple vs. Past Simple
  45. Lesson Plan for Making Predictions
  46. Can I pay for my online courses in instalments?
  47. Can I transfer my course from interactive to offline?
  48. Can I take the interactive course and then have a hard copy of the material after I’ve completed?

  • What's the difference between TEFL and TESOL?

    TEFL means Teaching English as Foreign Language
    TESOL means Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

    The terms mean the same thing and are often used interchangeably.

    It doesn't matter whether you do a TEFL course or TESOL course, but if choosing an online option, then an accredited TEFL course is important. Ensure your online TEFL certificate/TESOL certificate is awarded by an professional external accrediting TEFL body such as ACTDEC and is not just an in-house certificate. See our accreditation page for more information on why getting the right accreditation is important.

  • Do I need a degree to do the course?

    No. Although many of our students do have degrees, we welcome applicants from a wide variety of backgrounds. ‘A’ levels, a HS diploma or significant life experience in teaching, business or some contact with children is advantageous. Some employers may wish you to have a degree and in certain countries (such as Korea) it will be needed so that a work visa can be issued. However our Travel and Teach section gives more advice of what you need for each country and should be a good starting point for information gathering before you travel.


  • What type of people take an online course?

    We have a wide range of trainees from a wide variety of different backgrounds. Some examples from our current students include:

    - Existing state sector/further education teachers looking to broaden their teaching base
    - Gap year students or ‘teacher travellers’
    - People wishing to teach ESL to immigrants
    - Mature students looking for a change of career
    - People who plan to move or retire overseas
    - Non native English teachers or foreign teachers abroad
    - English people already living overseas who wish to teach EFL locally

  • I am a non-native English speaker - can I do one of your courses?

    Yes, of course! We welcome applications from people whose first language is not English. However, non-native speakers should possess a high standard of both written and spoken English. As a general guide, if you have English to one of the following international exam levels then you should be successful on a GE course:

    - IELTS 6.5 or above
    - TOEFL iBT 110 or above
    - TOEIC 880 or above
    - CEF C1
    - pass at Cambridge CAE (Certificate in Advanced English).

    While we do not test applicants on their level of English, should submitted work contain a significant number of errors and understanding is impeded, at our discretion, it will be passed back to the student for re-working until it is of an acceptable level. Marks are deducted for poor use of English in responses.

    If you do not have an acceptable level of English to succeed on the course then we reserve the right to cancel your course and refund your course fees.

  • Help! I’m stuck on a question, what do I do?

    Call or chat with your tutor via your student login page.

    The depth and quality of the tutor response and marking generates the most positive student comments on our returned course quality questionnaires, which are sent out to students on course completion.

    While we won't necessarily provide you with the correct answer, we will point you in the right direction.

  • What type of assignments are there?

    On our accredited courses there are stop and think tasks throughout. These may take the form of simple multi-choice answers or require more in-depth responses that are tutor-assessed. You might be asked to map out the seating arrangements for a class of 12 students or comment on the choice of material for a group of young learners. There is sample material on each of the course pages. We aim to provide tasks and material that will be of real, practical use to you in the classroom.

    The grammar courses are all multi-choice response with explanations following each question, with further tutor support if required. All our courses come with access to a personal tutor and the forum, where you can share ideas with other trainees.

  • How is my work assessed?

    You are graded by continuous assessment. In this way you always know how you are doing and we know your strengths and can help you with any potentially weak areas.

    Your marks are added up as you proceed through the course and there are more marks for the latter modules, so you have the chance to make up any marks you may have missed out on in the earlier ones.

    So that you can check the level you are at, you need to get 50% for a Pass, roughly 67% for a B grade (ACTDEC Pass with Merit) and 83% for an A grade (ACTDEC Pass with Distinction). You’ll receive individual comments on all of your completed sections. Not just ticks and crosses but feedback designed to be of real help to you as you progress.

  • When can I start and when do I receive the course?

    You can start any time and you will receive access to the student login page just as soon as you sign up and make payment.

    We will assign your tutor within 24  hours or on the next working day.

  • If I’m not satisfied or change my mind, do I get my money back?

    In this unlikely event, simply email us that you have decided to withdraw within 14 days and return any materials sent to you to receive a full refund. See our Terms and Conditions for more details.

  • After the course, do I get a certificate and any help in terms of my job search?

    Upon successful completion of our online courses you will receive the appropriate Global English certificate in PDF format, free as a part of your course. A printed version is available via our Bookstore page for a small extra fee. An ACTDEC certificate in PDF format is available for an extra fee for the Level 2, 3, 4 and 5 courses from the same location. Purchase upon completion of your course.  

    Weekend course students will receive a TEFL certificate. We will also let you know when schools contact us looking to recruit our graduates through our regular emails.  

    TESOL CV help is provided in the modules but for more individual help in your search for work, contact our office via your student login page.

  • Is there a maximum time limit for course completion?

    It's 18 months for all level 2 and level 3 courses and 6 months for level 1 and our follow-on courses. We have found that time limits help with motivation. Plus it ensures there are not significant gaps of time between the completion of each module - so you can remember what you've learned and recall it more easily.

    However, we know that sometimes life gets in the way and so it is usually possible to extend your course. You can get 3 types of extension through your student login page:

    30 days - £25         
    90 days - £45         
    180 days - £65

  • How quickly can I do a Global English course?

    If you can devote some time to your studies every day, you can complete the Level 1 course in as little as 2 weeks, and the Level 2 in 3-4 weeks. Typically, people take longer because they are working and fit their studies around other commitments. But we will go at your pace.

    Our marking turnaround in a maximum of 3 working days, so we aim to keep you going and you always have access to your modules in advance.

  • Can I start the course here and take it abroad to finish it?

    Yes. Many people do this and secure teaching work abroad on the basis that they have started with us. We have provided many mid-course references on behalf of our students to potential employers. The courses work really well if you are already teaching, as they will give you new ideas and materials to try out with your students.

  • Do I have to speak a second language to be able to teach English overseas?

    Although it is not generally necessary to speak a second language to teach overseas, it does depend a little on the country and it will certainly be helpful if you can learn a little before you go. This will help you to adjust both socially and culturally to the country where you are teaching. It will also broaden your appeal to potential employers, who will be more confident in offering you a greater range of classes (including lower level learner groups), where you might have to give basic instructions in their language. This is also the case where a school or institute has a lot of very young learners.

    Once you are there, try to learn as much of the language as you can. Sometimes it is possible to arrange exchange lessons with a student who is learning English. You provide them with free additional English lessons - they provide you with basic lessons in their language. Some of the better schools will help to arrange this for you as it is in their interest that you stay and not leave part way through your contract.

  • Can I call to book a weekend course?

    Yes, just phone us on 01392 411999 to speak to William or Louisa, Monday to Friday 09.00 – 18.00. We can take your booking and are happy to give help and advice.

  • If I book online, will I get a confirmation?

    Yes, you will get an automatic confirmation of your course booking once your payment has been processed.

  • Can I change my booking once I have made it?

    Booked weekend courses are transferable up to 7 clear days before original course commencement and subject to availability for a £50 fee. Within 7 clear days, no transfers are permitted.  No refunds are permitted on transferred courses.  See our terms and conditions here: https://www.global-english.com/terms.php

  • Can I cancel my booking?

    All weekend and 3 day courses fees are subject to a non-refundable £75 deposit, which will be retained by Global English should you decide not to proceed with your course. If you decide to withdraw from your course within 14 days of the course commencing, then no refund will be issued. Also see our terms and conditions here: https://www.global-english.com/terms.php

  • Do I have to make payment in full?

    Spaces on courses fill up fast so we ask you to make full payment at the time of booking. You can pay by credit or debit card through the website, over the phone on 01392 411999, or call us to make other payment arrangements. Once we have received your full payment your space will be reserved.

  • Do you have a cancellation list?

    Sorry, we don’t but our courses do run fairly frequently, so like London buses, there will be another one along in a minute. Check the realtime availability on our course booking page: https://www.global-english.com/weekend-courses/.

  • Who runs the weekend courses?

    Global English works in conjunction with the TEFL organisation. They operate the Weekend aspect of the courses and they will issue your certificate upon successful course completion. They’ll send out your joining instructions too. All correspondence about your weekend programme should be directed to info@TEFL.org.uk.

  • Can I start my online course before my weekend programme?

    Yes, you can do the courses in any order. We will send out your course book if you enrol on the Young Learner or Business course when you enrol. The course itself is conducted online, so you can get started on straight away.

  • What certificates do I get when I finish?

    If you have completed a weekend or 3 day course, you will be sent your TEFL certificate upon completion of an online questionnaire. This should arrive with you within around 7 days. 

  • How big are the weekend classes – how many students are there?

    Our classes have around 20 students. Numbers vary depending on the time of year, so classes may be smaller.

  • What qualification will I get?

    You will receive a 20 or 30 hour certificate (depending on which course you take) in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL).

  • Can I apply for a job as soon as I pass the course?

    As soon as you receive your certificate you can apply for jobs in the UK and overseas. Ask your trainer on the course for more information.

  • Will there be help in finding a job?

    Yes, A range of full time paid placements in are available in Viewnam, South Korea an China, as well as opportunities for seasonal positions in Spain, Turkey, Greece, Italy and the UK.

  • How long has Global English been going?

    Global English was founded in 1996 and the first student enrolled in 1997. Since then, around 10,000 people have taken a TEFL course with us. We were the first TEFL organisation worldwide to become ISO accredited in 2002, and in 2005 we gained recognised ACTDEC accreditation for our courses.

    Our service doesn't end with your certificate. We aim to be a source of ongoing support and help for our trainees for as long as they remain TEFL teachers.

  • Planning an Engagement and Free Practice activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    Look at the following reading text, aimed at around intermediate level. Think of a suitable engagement activity, which would be a useful introduction to the Presentation stage and describe it. Plan an activity that would take 5 – 10 minutes.

    Then use your imagination to prepare a free practice activity based on the study activity. Please limit each activity to 100 words.

    The clown took the red nose off his face and began to cry.  But an acrobat tumbled into him and he fell onto the circus floor.  The people who were watching laughed and shouted, enjoying the performance of the circus.  They had seen lions and tigers, majestic elephants and colourful shows.  Some of the children were getting tired, but none wanted to go home.  Sally kept nagging her Grandfather for another chocolate ice cream, but he wouldn’t buy her one.  She had eaten two already.

    This is the first ‘challenging’ question on the course that you are awarded marks for, so it is worth making a brief note here about what is expected.

    Essentially you have been given a study text, which will form the ‘study’ part of your lesson. Now you have been asked to put together an engagement activity and a free practice activity to fit around the study section. There are 8 marks available here – 4 for each activity that you produce.

    The key to this question is to base your activities around the theme of the Circus, which is the main theme of the reading.

    In the engagement activity, you wish to get your students thinking about the theme. Try to involve them in the activity and get them interested in the subject. Provide an example of how you will do this and say what you think they will produce. Remember that the engagement stage is quite short but that it should be interesting and introduce the topic effectively.

    In the free practice activity, remember the distinction between free practice and controlled practice. With free practice we are not doing gap fill activities, rather we are trying to get students to produce the language based around the theme, perhaps revising anything that has been introduce in the engagement or study stages. Therefore writing or speaking activities are often popular in the free practice stage. Again, provide an example of what you expect your class to come up with.

    The three stages of presentation, study and practice are well documented in this section of module 1. If in doubt, reread this section as it will give you good ideas of what is expected at each stage.

  • Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This is the first exam question on the course and it has the most number of points of any question in Module 1.

    What you have been asked to do here is to produce a lesson plan. The first stage should be to go back to the lesson planning and staging section of this module and review the content there. There is a sample plan for you to review. Then take a second look at the reading section of this module. 

    While there is no one correct answer, some of the following points may come in handy in preventing you from making mistakes in your plan. 

    • Choose a theme

    Lessons often flow better if your students have a common theme around which to base their studies. There are many possible themes (holidays, travel, work leisure time, etc.) and the theme that you choose should be connected to the reading text that you have selected.

    • State your aims

    This is very important – without the aim you will have no way of evaluating how successful your lesson has been. When we plan a reading lesson, we need to think about the type of reading skills that are being practised. For example, are students reading to gain a detailed understanding of text, or to guess meaning from context? Or reading quickly to get gist, or reading to find specific information?  Think about the specific skill you intend and state this clearly in the aims box at the top of the plan.

    • Introducing your lesson

    This is the first 5 –10 minutes where you welcome the students, engage them and get them warmed up in English. It begins when you walk in to the classroom. Then the presentation stage is where you present the theme and here you want to get your class warmed up and interested in the topic and what is to come. A good idea is to use pictures and prompts – bring in a link to your theme (e.g. if your topic is the Circus, for example – bring in a clown’s wig and nose, or a picture of a clown). Introduce these to your students and get them speaking. You can pre-teach any new language from the text in this section as well.

    • Choosing Reading Material

    Some students fall down here because they select reading material that is too long, too hard or too easy for the group they have in mind. Think about the group that you are going to teach and ask yourself the following questions:

    1. What level are the group?
    2. Is there a common age (adults, teenagers, young learners etc.?)
    3. What kind of material are they going to be interested in?
    4. How long is your text or reading? As a guideline, look at a course book (Such as Headway or Cutting Edge) to see what they consider an appropriate length of text for a class. Look at our suggestions in Module one on what students can do at different levels.
    5. Look to limit your text to about 250 words for an Intermediate level class
    6. This reading will probably take place in the study stage of your plan.
    • Text analysis

    One way of seeing if your students have understood the text is to develop questions based on the content of the reading. These could be quick concept questions, (Yes/No, True/False) answers, followed by deeper comprehension questions, which ask the students for specific information. However you don’t have to do this if you can think of other exercises to make sure that students have understood what they have read. Again, taking place in the study stage, these will be controlled exercises.

    • Practice

    It is always good to build on your study stage with a free practice - something productive to get students writing or speaking. Choose an activity that develops the theme or an aspect of the reading, or perhaps work on the language that you have covered in the lesson. This will consolidate the learning that has taken place. It will help if you can do something fun at the end to send students out on a high. 

    • Timing

    Make sure that your timings are balanced (see the discussion on timing you plan at the end of the section on Lesson Planning and Staging). For all your lesson plans with us, we suggest you choose a time frame of between 60 and 90 minutes for the whole lesson. Most face to face lessons are on average 1 hour long, so if you begin planning with this in mind you won’t go far wrong when you start teaching.

    • Evaluation

    Remember to answer the evaluation questions at the end of your plan – self critique is an important skill for all teachers, old hands as well as trainees, so try to get into this frame of mind now.

    Follow these steps and you should be on your way to a successful lesson plan for the reading lesson.

  • Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer.

    While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This is the first exam question on the course and it has the most number of points of any question in Module 1 of the Level 2 with Business course.

    What you have been asked to do here is to produce a lesson plan. You have a choice, one where you find your own material for a group of students, or one where we have supplied you with a text for an intermediate level 1-2-1 student.

    Whichever you choose, the first stage should be to go back to the lesson planning and staging section of this module and review the content there. There is a sample plan for you to review. Then take a second look at the reading section of this module. 

    While there is no one correct answer, some of the following points may come in handy in preventing you from making mistakes in your plan.

    • Choose a theme

    Lessons often flow better if your students have a common theme around which to base their studies. There are many possible themes (holidays, travel, work leisure time, etc.) and the theme that you choose should be connected to the reading text that you have selected. If you select the text that we have supplied, then your are more restricted in theme choice (healthy eating, food trends, marketing and branding are potential themes here).

    • State your aims

    This is very important – without the aim you will have no way of evaluating how successful your lesson has been. When we plan a reading lesson, we need to think about the type of reading skills that are being practised. For example, are students reading to gain a detailed understanding of text, or to guess meaning from context? Or reading quickly to get gist, or reading to find specific information?  Think about the specific skill you intend and state this clearly in the aims box at the top of the plan. 

    • Introducing your lesson

    This is the first 5 –10 minutes where you welcome the students, engage them and get them warmed up in English. It begins when you walk in to the classroom. Then the presentation stage is where you present the theme and here you want to get your class warmed up and interested in the topic and what is to come. A good idea is to use pictures and prompts – bring in a link to your theme (e.g. if your topic is the Circus, for example – bring in a clown’s wig and nose, or a picture of a clown). Introduce these to your students and get them speaking. You can pre-teach any new language from the text in this section as well. 

    • Choosing Reading Material

    If you have chosen question A, this will be relevant to you. If you have chosen question B, then move on.  Some students fall down here because they select reading material that is too long, too hard or too easy for the group they have in mind. Think about the group that you are going to teach and ask yourself the following questions:

    1. What level are the group?
    2. Is there a common age (adults, teenagers, young learners etc.?)
    3. What kind of material are they going to be interested in?
    4. How long is your text or reading? As a guideline, look at a course book (Such as Headway or Cutting Edge) to see what they consider an appropriate length of text for a class. Look at our suggestions in Module one on what students can do at different levels.

    Look to limit your text to about 250 words for an Intermediate level class. This reading will probably take place in the study stage of your plan.

    • Text analysis

    One way of seeing if your students have understood the text is to develop questions based on the content of the reading. These could be quick concept questions, (Yes/No, True/False) answers, followed by deeper comprehension questions, which ask the students for specific information. However you don’t have to do this if you can think of other exercises to make sure that students have understood what they have read. Again, taking place in the study stage, these will be controlled exercises.

    • Practice

    It is always good to build on your study stage with a free practice - something productive to get students writing or speaking. Choose an activity that develops the theme or an aspect of the reading, or perhaps work on the language that you have covered in the lesson. This will consolidate the learning that has taken place. It will help if you can do something fun at the end to send students out on a high. Follow these steps and you should be on your way to a successful lesson plan for the reading lesson.

    • Timing

    Make sure that your timings are balanced (see the discussion on timing you plan at the end of the section on Lesson Planning and Staging). For all your lesson plans with us, we suggest you choose a time frame of between 60 and 90 minutes for the whole lesson. Most face to face lessons are on average 1 hour long, so if you begin planning with this in mind you won’t go far wrong when you start teaching.

    • Evaluation

    Remember to answer the evaluation questions at the end of your plan – self critique is an important skill for all teachers, old hands as well as trainees, so try to get into this frame of mind now.

  • Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer.

    While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused. 

    This is the first exam question on the course and it has the most number of points of any question in Module 1.

    What you have been asked to do here is to produce a lesson plan. You have a choice, one where you find your own material for a group of students, or one where you find material for a student who of a level you feel comfortable in teaching.

    Whichever you choose, the first stage should be to go back to the lesson planning and staging section of this module and review the content there. There is a sample plan for you to review. Then take a second look at the reading section of this module. 

    While there is no one correct answer, some of the following points may come in handy in preventing you from making mistakes in your plan.

    • Choose a theme

    Lessons often flow better if your students have a common theme around which to base their studies. There are many possible themes (holidays, travel, work leisure time, etc.) and the theme that you choose should be connected to the reading text that you have selected.

    •  Introducing your lesson

    This is the first 5 –10 minutes where you welcome the students, engage them and get them warmed up in English. It begins when you walk in to the classroom. Then the presentation stage is where you present the theme and here you want to get your class warmed up and interested in the topic and what is to come. A good idea is to use pictures and prompts – bring in a link to your theme (e.g. if your topic is the Circus, for example – bring in a clown’s wig and nose, or a picture of a clown). Introduce these to your students and get them speaking. You can pre-teach any new language from the text in this section as well.

    •  Choosing Reading Material

    Some students fall down here because they select reading material that is too long, too hard or too easy for the group they have in mind. Think about the group that you are going to teach and ask yourself the following questions:

    1. What level are the group?
    2. Is there a common age (adults, teenagers, young learners etc.?)
    3. What kind of material are they going to be interested in?
    4. How long is your text or reading? As a guideline, look at a course book (Such as Headway or Cutting Edge) to see what they consider an appropriate length of text for a class. Look at our suggestions in Module one on what students can do at different levels.

    Look to limit your text to about 250 words for an Intermediate level class.

    This reading will probably take place in the study stage of your plan.

    •  Text analysis

    One way of seeing if your students have understood the text is to develop questions based on the content of the reading. These could be quick concept questions, (Yes/No, True/False) answers, followed by deeper comprehension questions, which ask the students for specific information. However you don’t have to do this if you can think of other exercises to make sure that students have understood what they have read. Again, taking place in the study stage, these will be controlled exercises.

    • Practice

    It is always good to build on your study stage with a free practice - something productive to get students writing or speaking. Choose an activity that develops the theme or an aspect of the reading, or perhaps work on the language that you have covered in the lesson. This will consolidate the learning that has taken place. It will help if you can do something fun at the end to send students out on a high. 

    • Timing

    Make sure that your timings are balanced (see the discussion on timing you plan at the end of the section on Lesson Planning and Staging). For all your lesson plans with us, we suggest you choose a time frame of between 60 and 90 minutes for the whole lesson. Most face to face lessons are on average 1 hour long, so if you begin planning with this in mind you won’t go far wrong when you start teaching.

    • Evaluation

    Remember to answer the evaluation questions at the end of your plan – self critique is an important skill for all teachers, old hands as well as trainees, so try to get into this frame of mind now.

    Follow these steps and you should be on your way to a successful lesson plan for the reading lesson.

  • Lesson Plan based around Reading Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer.

    While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This is the first exam question on the course and it has the most number of points of any question in Module 1.

    What you have been asked to do here is to produce a lesson plan. The first stage should be to go back to the lesson planning and staging section of this module and review the content there. There is a sample plan for you to review. Then take a second look at the reading section of this module. While there is no one correct answer, some of the following points may come in handy in preventing you from making mistakes in your plan.

    • Choose a theme

    Lessons often flow better if your students have a common theme around which to base their studies. There are many possible themes (holidays, travel, work leisure time, etc.) and the theme that you choose should be connected to the reading text that you have selected.

    •  Introducing your lesson

    This is the first 5 –10 minutes where you welcome the students, engage them and get them warmed up in English. It begins when you walk in to the classroom. Then the presentation stage is where you present the theme and here you want to get your class warmed up and interested in the topic and what is to come. A good idea is to use pictures and prompts – bring in a link to your theme (e.g. if your topic is the Circus, for example – bring in a clown’s wig and nose, or a picture of a clown). Introduce these to your students and get them speaking. You can pre-teach any new language from the text in this section as well.

    • Choosing Reading Material

    Some students fall down here because they select reading material that is too long, too hard or too easy for the group they have in mind. Think about the group that you are going to teach and ask yourself the following questions:

    1. What level are the group?
    2. Is there a common age (adults, teenagers, young learners etc.?)
    3. What kind of material are they going to be interested in?
    4. How long is your text or reading? As a guideline, look at a course book (Such as Headway or Cutting Edge) to see what they consider an appropriate length of text for a class. Look at our suggestions in Module one on what students can do at different levels.

    Look to limit your text to about 250 words for an Intermediate level class.

    This reading will probably take place in the study stage of your plan.

    • Text analysis

    One way of seeing if your students have understood the text is to develop questions based on the content of the reading. These could be quick concept questions, (Yes/No, True/False) answers, followed by deeper comprehension questions, which ask the students for specific information. However you don’t have to do this if you can think of other exercises to make sure that students have understood what they have read. Again, taking place in the study stage, these will be controlled exercises.

    • Practice

    It is always good to build on your study stage with a free practice - something productive to get students writing or speaking. Choose an activity that develops the theme or an aspect of the reading, or perhaps work on the language that you have covered in the lesson. This will consolidate the learning that has taken place. It will help if you can do something fun at the end to send students out on a high.

    • Timing

    Make sure that your timings are balanced (see the discussion on timing you plan at the end of the section on Lesson Planning and Staging). For all your lesson plans with us, we suggest you choose a time frame of between 60 and 90 minutes for the whole lesson. Most face to face lessons are on average 1 hour long, so if you begin planning with this in mind you won’t go far wrong when you start teaching.

    • Evaluation

    Remember to answer the evaluation questions at the end of your plan – self critique is an important skill for all teachers, old hands as well as trainees, so try to get into this frame of mind now.

    Follow these steps and you should be on your way to a successful lesson plan for the reading lesson.

  • Lexis for an Upper-Intermediate level group

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This question is in 2 parts.

    In the first section we ask you to produce a lexis for a group of upper intermediate students. There are 5 marks awarded for this part of the question. We recommend you write up to 50 words. Although 50 is a guideline, we won’t penalise you if you go one or 2 over, but if you fall 10 short then you will run the risk of losing some marks.  So this means looking at some more challenging lexical items. Of those 50 or so, you are aiming for 10 words that would be new, or challenging for a group of students at this level. If you would like more information on the type of level and language upper-intermediate students would be expected to handle, have a look at some of the sample material from the following Landmark Upper- Intermediate page here:

     You can write your answers in blocks provided (we have done this for reasons of simplicity for the module, although in reality your web could look more like the one in the Study Booklet). Highlight, underline or put an * by the words you think would be new for this level of student.

    You will get up to 5 of your marks here.

    In the next part, we are looking for an effective way for approaching the lesson, and we will give credit to any approach which develops the language in context. A maximum of 5 marks credit are available here. To gain all 5 marks, you should indicate that how your students would use some of the new language from the web in the lesson to help them learn the language in context. Note that we are not asking for a lesson plan here, rather your approach to the lesson, outlining the kind of activities you would employ to help students maximise their learning and recall of the new language in context.

  • Irregular Past Tense Lesson Plan (including Verb Pelmanism)

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    In this question you are asked to expand the idea of verb pelmanism into a full lesson based around irregular past tenses.  The question asks your to choose a theme for the verbs and outline a lesson plan for a multilingual group of intermediate adult students studying English for pleasure on a four-week course in the UK.  You are to assume the students are from more than one country and speak different languages. This question is not particularly difficult but often students do lose marks here by not providing enough information or perhaps misinterpreting what we are asking for.

    One of the most common questions we are asked is ‘What do you mean by the theme?’

    Quite simply most of your lessons will have some kind of theme running through them. A theme is a topic or subject around which are based the activities you work on to develop student learning. For example, in Module 1 we used the theme of the Circus in question 11 – the text was based around 2 people who were watching a show.

    Popular themes for this lesson plan for irregular verbs include:

    • Holidays
    • Travelling to the UK
    • A day out

    However feel free to choose your own theme.

    After you have chosen your theme, think of irregular verbs, appropriate for the Intermediate level at which this lesson is pitched, and write some down. Try to get at least 10 verbs in your list that you will have students work with, including some that will be new to them. Then set the objective for your lesson. What are you going to try to achieve here? Later on you are also asked how you would measure whether you had been successful in your teaching. Therefore, don’t set unrealistic objectives such as ‘speak fluently in the past tense’, but make you objectives more specific and link them to the verbs you have chosen or the particular skills that you wish to develop in this lesson.

    Again getting a balance of activities is important here, as well as timing each component part of the plan. If possible provide examples of what you will ask your students to do and also say what you will be doing at each stage. You must include the pelmanism game, but you can do this at any stage of the lesson that you feel is appropriate. However, the whole plan shouldn’t revolve around one long game of pelmanism – remember to build in other activities (writing, reading, speaking etc.), that will develop these skills as well.

    Take your time here – as this question is worth 45 marks and is the joint highest scoring question in this module.

  • Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.  

    This exam question for a lesson plan for writing is more directed than the exam question for reading. In some respects this makes it a little easier. Again it is worth 45 marks, which means that it is the joint highest scoring question in this module.

    Even though you have a choice of theme, read the question carefully before you start, in conjunction with these notes. For example – the lesson is for 1 hour, to a group of Intermediate level adults. This gives you the timing and the pitch of the material. Also you are instructed that this is a writing lesson. This doesn’t mean that the whole of the lesson is to be spent with students putting pen to paper. However it does mean that the main focus is to be a writing activity and that this should be done ‘in class’ rather than set as homework.

    Then you are directed towards a theme. No one theme is designed to be any easier or more difficult than the others – simply choose the one that you think suits you best and that you would have most fun teaching. The choices are:

    i)       Lonely hearts

    ii)      Horoscopes

    iii)    Job Application

    The notes in the question guide you to set out the lesson plan, starting with an engagement activity or warmer and presentation which will lead into the main writing task. Most people choose to do this in the Practice part of the plan, but you can choose to do it in the Study section and then follow this up with something lighter if you prefer (see 4 below).

    1. One of the key things here is to not overwhelm your students with too much material. Showing them hundreds of job adverts, lonely-hearts ads or horoscopes will give rise to lots of questions about vocabulary, which may lead your lesson to get sidetracked. Therefore choose your material carefully and limit it so that you won’t find your time running away with you. You’ll need to ensure you have enough time for the writing task at the end.
    2. Also think about giving your students a helping hand by pre-teaching the new vocabulary before you hand out any reading or material you have found. For example, few students will have heard of GSOH (Good Sense of Humour) but it is bound to come up if you are teaching the subject of lonely hearts. Similarly, don’t assume that just because you have heard of the star signs that your students will have. So take some time here. Perhaps give them some abbreviations and get them to work out what they mean in pairs or groups before your launch into the lesson. In the same way with Similarly with the job advert – if it is in a particular area, brainstorm vocabulary relating to the area before you look at the advert.
    3. Think about the writing activity – remember that this is the main focus of your lesson and your students should probably be spending more time here than on any other individual segment of the lesson plan. Perhaps a model answer might be a good idea? This would be good to analyse is the study section of the plan. Certainly give them some parameters as to how much you expect them to write. Also it is worth mentioning what you will be doing here, going around the room helping, making suggestions and prompting your students.
    4. Finally look to include a follow up activity, perhaps something lighter after all that writing. Some students have had their classes dressing up as Mystic Meg in the horoscopes lesson and making predictions about what is going to happen to their classmates, enabling practice of future forms and a lot of fun. This can be a longer activity in the practice stage, or a short warm down, depending on where you have done the main writing in your lesson.

    We ask that you include as much detail as you can, as credit cannot be given if you leave things out. Make sure that you include examples of what you want your students to achieve. You should look to write a minimum of 500 words and note that words from a magazine (or other reading text) article do not count towards the suggested word limit.

    If you need some further guidance or examples you might like to look at the suggested reference points listed in the further research box of the writing section before commencing your plan. You are also free to use some of the ideas presented in the writing section itself.

  • Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.  

    The exam question in Module 2 is more directed than the exam question in Module 1. In some respects this makes it a little easier. Again it is worth 45 marks, which means that it is the joint highest scoring question in Module 2.

    Even though you have a choice of theme, read the question carefully before you start, in conjunction with these notes. For example – the lesson is for 1 hour, to a group of Intermediate level adults. This gives you the timing and the pitch of the material. Also you are instructed that this is a writing lesson. This doesn’t mean that the whole of the lesson is to be spent with students putting pen to paper. However it does mean that the main focus is to be a writing activity and that this should be done ‘in class’ rather than set as homework.

    Then you are directed towards a theme. No one theme is designed to be any easier or more difficult than the others – simply choose the one that you think suits you best and that you would have most fun teaching. The choices are:

    i)       Lonely hearts

    ii)      Horoscopes

    iii)    Job Application

    The notes in the question guide you to set out the lesson plan, starting with an engagement activity or warmer and presentation which will lead into the main writing task. Most people choose to do this in the Practice part of the plan, but you can choose to do it in the Study section and then follow this up with something lighter if you prefer (see 4 below).

    1. One of the key things here is to not overwhelm your students with too much material. Showing them hundreds of job adverts, lonely-hearts ads or horoscopes will give rise to lots of questions about vocabulary, which may lead your lesson to get sidetracked. Therefore choose your material carefully and limit it so that you won’t find your time running away with you. You’ll need to ensure you have enough time for the writing task at the end.
    2. Also think about giving your students a helping hand by pre-teaching the new vocabulary before you hand out any reading or material you have found. For example, few students will have heard of GSOH (Good Sense of Humour) but it is bound to come up if you are teaching the subject of lonely hearts. Similarly, don’t assume that just because you have heard of the star signs that your students will have. So take some time here. Perhaps give them some abbreviations and get them to work out what they mean in pairs or groups before your launch into the lesson. In the same way with Similarly with the job advert – if it is in a particular area, brainstorm vocabulary relating to the area before you look at the advert.
    3. Think about the writing activity – remember that this is the main focus of your lesson and your students should probably be spending more time here than on any other individual segment of the lesson plan. Perhaps a model answer might be a good idea? This would be good to analyse is the study section of the plan. Certainly give them some parameters as to how much you expect them to write. Also it is worth mentioning what you will be doing here, going around the room helping, making suggestions and prompting your students.
    4. Finally look to include a follow up activity, perhaps something lighter after all that writing. Some students have had their classes dressing up as Mystic Meg in the horoscopes lesson and making predictions about what is going to happen to their classmates, enabling practice of future forms and a lot of fun. This can be a longer activity in the practice stage, or a short warm down, depending on where you have done the main writing in your lesson.

    We ask that you include as much detail as you can, as credit cannot be given if you leave things out. Make sure that you include examples of what you want your students to achieve. You should look to write a minimum of 500 words and note that words from a magazine (or other reading text) article do not count towards the suggested word limit.

    If you need some further guidance or examples you might like to look at the suggested reference points listed in the further research box of the writing section before commencing your plan. You are also free to use some of the ideas presented in the writing section itself.

  • Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.  

    The exam question in this module is more directed than the exam question in Module 1. In some respects this makes it a little easier. Again it is worth 45 marks, which means that it is the joint highest scoring question in Module 2.

    Even though you have a choice of theme, read the question carefully before you start, in conjunction with these notes. For example – the lesson is for 1 hour, to a group of Intermediate level adults. This gives you the timing and the pitch of the material. Also you are instructed that this is a writing lesson. This doesn’t mean that the whole of the lesson is to be spent with students putting pen to paper. However it does mean that the main focus is to be a writing activity and that this should be done ‘in class’ rather than set as homework.

    Then you are directed towards a theme. No one theme is designed to be any easier or more difficult than the others – simply choose the one that you think suits you best and that you would have most fun teaching. The choices are:

    i)       Lonely hearts

    ii)      Horoscopes

    iii)    Job Application

    The notes in the question guide you to set out the lesson plan, starting with an engagement activity or warmer and presentation which will lead into the main writing task. Most people choose to do this in the Practice part of the plan, but you can choose to do it in the Study section and then follow this up with something lighter if you prefer (see 4 below).

    1. One of the key things here is to not overwhelm your students with too much material. Showing them hundreds of job adverts, lonely-hearts ads or horoscopes will give rise to lots of questions about vocabulary, which may lead your lesson to get sidetracked. Therefore choose your material carefully and limit it so that you won’t find your time running away with you. You’ll need to ensure you have enough time for the writing task at the end.
    2. Also think about giving your students a helping hand by pre-teaching the new vocabulary before you hand out any reading or material you have found. For example, few students will have heard of GSOH (Good Sense of Humour) but it is bound to come up if you are teaching the subject of lonely hearts. Similarly, don’t assume that just because you have heard of the star signs that your students will have. So take some time here. Perhaps give them some abbreviations and get them to work out what they mean in pairs or groups before your launch into the lesson. In the same way with Similarly with the job advert – if it is in a particular area, brainstorm vocabulary relating to the area before you look at the advert.
    3. Think about the writing activity – remember that this is the main focus of your lesson and your students should probably be spending more time here than on any other individual segment of the lesson plan. Perhaps a model answer might be a good idea? This would be good to analyse is the study section of the plan. Certainly give them some parameters as to how much you expect them to write. Also it is worth mentioning what you will be doing here, going around the room helping, making suggestions and prompting your students.
    4. Finally look to include a follow up activity, perhaps something lighter after all that writing. Some students have had their classes dressing up as Mystic Meg in the horoscopes lesson and making predictions about what is going to happen to their classmates, enabling practice of future forms and a lot of fun. This can be a longer activity in the practice stage, or a short warm down, depending on where you have done the main writing in your lesson.

    We ask that you include as much detail as you can, as credit cannot be given if you leave things out. Make sure that you include examples of what you want your students to achieve. You should look to write a minimum of 500 words and note that words from a magazine (or other reading text) article do not count towards the suggested word limit.

    If you need some further guidance or examples you might like to look at the suggested reference points listed in the further research box of the writing section before commencing your plan. You are also free to use some of the ideas presented in the writing section itself.

  • Lesson Plan based around Writing Activity

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    The exam question in Module 2 is more directed than the exam question in Module 1. In some respects this makes it a little easier. Again it is worth 45 marks, which means that it is the joint highest scoring question in Module 2.

    You have a choice, one where you find your own material for a group of adult students, or one where you choose from a different set of themes for a group of young primary aged learners. Even though you have a choice of theme, read the question carefully before you start, in conjunction with these notes.

    For example – the lesson is for 1 hour, to a specific group. This gives you the timing and the pitch of the material. Also you are instructed that this is a writing lesson. This doesn’t mean that the whole of the lesson is to be spent with students putting pen to paper. However it does mean that the main focus is to be a writing activity and that this should be done ‘in class’ rather than set as homework.

    Then you are directed towards a theme. No one theme is designed to be any easier or more difficult than the others – simply choose the one that you think suits you best and that you would have most fun teaching.

    The notes in the question guide you to set out the lesson plan, starting with an engagement activity or warmer and presentation which will lead into the main writing task. Most people choose to do this in the Practice part of the plan, but you can choose to do it in the Study section and then follow this up with something lighter if you prefer (see 4 below).

    1. One of the key things here is to not overwhelm your students with too much material. Showing them hundreds of job adverts, lonely-hearts ads or horoscopes will give rise to lots of questions about vocabulary, which may lead your lesson to get sidetracked. Similarly with images of sport stars or animals with the youngsters. Therefore choose your material carefully and limit it so that you won’t find your time running away with you. You’ll need to ensure you have enough time for the writing task at the end.
    2. Also think about giving your students a helping hand by pre-teaching the new vocabulary before you hand out any reading or material you have found. For example, few adult students will have heard of GSOH (Good Sense of Humour) but it is bound to come up if you are teaching the subject of lonely hearts. Similarly, don’t assume that just because you have heard of the star signs that your students will have. So take some time here. Perhaps give them some abbreviations and get them to work out what they mean in pairs or groups before your launch into the lesson. In the same way with Similarly with the job advert – if it is in a particular area, brainstorm vocabulary relating to the area before you look at the advert.
    3. Think about the writing activity – remember that this is the main focus of your lesson and your students should probably be spending more time here than on any other individual segment of the lesson plan. Perhaps a model answer might be a good idea? This would be good to analyse is the study section of the plan. Certainly give them some parameters as to how much you expect them to write. Also it is worth mentioning what you will be doing here, going around the room helping, making suggestions and prompting your students.
    4. Finally look to include a follow up activity, perhaps something lighter after all that writing. Some students have had their classes dressing up as Mystic Meg in the horoscopes lesson and making predictions about what is going to happen to their classmates, enabling practice of future forms and a lot of fun. Or put your student’s written work, if illustrated with colourful diagrams, around the young learner classroom to make a display. This final activity can be longer in the practice stage, or a short warm down, depending on where you have done the main writing in your lesson.

    We ask that you include as much detail as you can, as credit cannot be given if you leave things out. Make sure that you include examples of what you want your students to achieve. You should look to write a minimum of 500 words and note that words from a magazine (or other reading text) article do not count towards the suggested word limit.

    If you need some further guidance or examples you might like to look at the suggested reference points listed in the further research box of the writing sections before commencing your plan. You are also free to use some of the ideas presented in the writing section itself.

  • Testing New Students - Grammar, Fluency, Pronunciation and Vocabulary

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    At first chance this question looks quite challenging. However, if you think of it as a jigsaw puzzle and take it stage by stage, you should find it easier. This question is worth 18 marks and there is one mark for each text or letter representation placed in the correct box.

    You’ll note that some examples have already been completed for you, at least one for each of the skill groups (grammar, fluency, pronunciation and vocabulary) . Look carefully at these examples. Now go to the list of the other 18 and identify into which category each falls. Once you have done this, you should find the task of ordering them from beginner to advanced easier.

    As a further clue, and like a jigsaw, it is easier to work from the edges first. So look at the top and bottom (beginner and advanced) first. This should make the task simpler.

  • Course Design for a Business English 1-1 Student

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This question is one that students often contact us about.

    Firstly we are not looking for a lesson plan for each of the 24 sessions, just a basic outline of what you would expect to teach and how you would put together your outline syllabus for this student for the 6 weeks course.

    There is no 1 way to do it, but as a guide you should be looking to include all 7 areas and to be spending at least 2 back to back lessons on each of these. Remember that your student will learn more easily if they focus on a particular area rather than cover it in isolation. Some areas may require more than 2 sessions, and there is one key event that happens at the end of week 3, so do bear this in mind when where you want to plan your lessons on meetings. 

    Also you should have noted that one of the weekly sessions is at a different time from the others. Think about your student’s concentration levels (and yours!) and how it might effect what you plan for this lesson. Generally we will look to award 15 of the 25 marks here in this part of the question.  

    In the second part of the question we have asked you to explain your thinking behind why you have ordered these sections in the way that you have. Write up to 250 words here explaining why the past simple comes where it does etc. We will award up to 10 marks here.

    As a final hint, we are not looking for you to go beyond the remit of the areas that the student’s Needs Analysis has asked you to cover (so don’t be tempted to thrown in that brilliant lesson you have got up your sleeve on the present perfect or the future here). All that this student needs is in the Needs Analysis at the top of the question.

  • Essay on the Future: Tense or Aspect?

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    ‘The future is not so much a tense as an aspect: our view of what is happening is more important.’

    Discuss how the aspect (or view) of the speaker often determines which future form he or she might use.

    Then explain how we use a range of different forms to express the future, citing 10 different uses with examples. You might like to take the section on the future (and in particular question in this module 5 as your starting point. Credit will be given for further research, where appropriate sources are cited.

    Finally, say why you think that our students find the future difficult, and give 2 examples of potential problems they may face.

    Your essay should between 750 and 1000 words in total.

    The future is a tricky area for many English language students, so what we are looking for here is a clear and concise discussion. Firstly, you need to recognise that the question is in 3 parts:

    1. Discuss the first part of this question - ‘the future is not so much a tense as an aspect: our view of what is happening is more important.’ Your discussion should involve some mention of how aspect is important in terms of how we view the future. A good place to start is the introduction to the future in Module 3, although you may choose to read more widely around the subject. Your grammar book (Murphy or Swan) may come in helpful here. Ideally we are looking for about 150-200 words on this, but if you can say it more succinctly then please do so.   There are 10 marks available for this part of your essay.
    2. The second part of the question is where most of the marks are to be gained. What we mean by ‘Explain how we use the different forms to express the future’ is that we want you to look at will, going to etc. and provide clear examples of how we use these forms to talk about future intentions, facts, etc. Again the section on the future in the Module will be a good starting point. Remember that will and going to have more than one use! However, for full credit some research will need to be demonstrated into other future forms that were not covered in the section. Also clear examples for each form and use should be included. There are 50 marks available here, nominally 5 marks for each form used appropraitely with an example.
    3. Finally, say why you think your students might find the future difficult, and then give 2 different examples of problems that you think they might face. Up to 15 marks are available in this concluding section.

    A word about the word limit. All the marks are available within the 750 -1000 word guideline. However, should you go over this by a few words then we will not penalise you. If you are writing considerable less than 750 words you run the risk of not covering the subject in sufficient depth and marks may be lost. If you write well in excess of 1000 words then the tutor maintains the right to draw a line at approximately 1000 words and award credit only for work up to this point. Basically it is a good idea to plan out your essay first so that you don’t write too much!

  • Lesson Plan for Prefixes and Suffixes

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    This is another lesson plan which we are providing advice on, and like the others you will need to ensure you produce a balance of receptive and productive activities. Both prefixes and suffixes should be dealt with here. But rather than go for a page of prefixes and suffixes with their meanings, the canny teacher will try to focus on a few of each, but teach them in a way which enables students to understand how they are used and aid their confidence in using them.

    The point around which this revolves is the text that you choose. Sometimes it can be hard to find a suitable text with prefixes and suffixes, especially if you do not have access to limitless material, so think about writing your own. Whichever you choose, it needs to be appropriate for this level and obviously it should contain some of your target prefixes and suffixes.

    So the selection of an appropriate text is important, as are the exercises to you choose to help learners at this level develop their understanding. Ideally we are looking for a blend of controlled and free practice activities, where students take the language studied and develop it. In the practice stage some trainees have their students continue the text on their own, using the targeted prefixes and suffixes but with other words.

    Marks will be awarded for a balanced plan, pitched appropriately for the level, where there are opportunities for learning and vocabulary development. Remember to cite your text source, develop your own ideas around it, ensure you have set a clear aim for the lesson and the completed the evaluation questions at the end of the text.

  • Lesson Plan for Present Perfect Simple vs. Past Simple

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused.

    Devise a lesson plan for the Present Perfect Simple and contrast this use with the Past Simple. You are to present it as a refresher lesson to a group of Intermediate students. You may wish to use an appropriate reading text and use this as a springboard for the lesson.  You can use one or more uses of the Present Perfect Simple as you aim to see how your students are progressing with their knowledge of this complex area.  Include all materials and detail how you would stage each part of the lesson. Assume that the lesson is to last for 1 hour. If you need some guidance you might like to look again the section in this module where we looked at the present perfect for giving news of recent events and also back to module 2, where we looked at the past simple tense.

    Please limit your response to a lesson plan of approximately 500 words, using the lesson plan template on the following page or another template of your choice.

    This is often found to be quite challenging. You need to follow the format of earlier lesson plans that you have written in earlier modules and make sure that your lesson has a clear beginning, middle and an ending.

    Another key point here is to note that this is a revision lesson. Therefore your class are already familiar with the present perfect simple and past simple and the purpose of this lesson is to revise their knowledge and understanding of when to use each form. You should not try to teach each of the 3 uses of the present perfect as this would be simple repetition for the students and probably a bit boring. So don’t too much time on this – we suggest just a simple check to make sure understand the forms and uses.

    The key to this lesson is finding or creating useful material and exercises that focus on the present perfect and contrasts this with the past simple. If you can choose a theme for your lesson, such as holidays, news or work, then this will help you to link the different stages of the plan together. For example, often the new headlines are in the present perfect:

    e.g. in the cricket, England have lost again against Australia.

    Whereas the actual reports are in the past simple:

    e.g. England’s batting collapsed again this morning against the Australian bowlers. They were all out for a total of 79 as Australia won the first test by an innings.

    Getting your students to understand this can help them to appreciate when to use each tense appropriately.

    You can choose a receptive skills focus (reading/listening) or a productive skills focus (writing/speaking). However a good revision lesson will probably contain some of both receptive and productive skills. Ideally your study stage will contain elements of controlled practice, and you might like to think about some kind of oral practice in the development/practice stage, where students will be able to show you:

    a) how well they can use each form,

    b) whether they can use them accurately

    c) whether then can differentiate when to use each one.

    This may also help you in understanding how successful your lesson has been, when you come to evaluating your lesson.

    There are 45 marks for this question and as the final lesson plan on the course, it is worth spending some time here.

     

  • Lesson Plan for Making Predictions

    The following question is one that Global English students frequently ask about. Here is some guidance as to what we are looking for in your answer. While you will not find specific answers here (they are for you to come up with!) we hope that this area of the website may give you some ideas for your answers if you are confused. 

    A Lesson Plan for Making Predictions

    Find an action picture which shows things that are about to happen. Think about how you could use the image in the classroom. Paste the picture in the space provided and use the image as the focus for a lesson plan based on making predictions. Think about your lesson objective and what you aim to teach (you can focus on opinions, evidence or both if you wish). State the lesson objective, the class level and student mix. Try to produce a rounded lesson including practice of both productive and receptive skills. Consider the level of the group you are teaching and make the exercises appropriate for the level, as well as timing each part of the plan.

    This is a lesson plan which often proves challenging for many students but it is worth 45 marks and you will pick up marks if you follow the following points:

    As you have with previous lesson plans, look carefully at the question. It is a lesson plan for predictions, not for plans for the future, so make sure that your examples reflect this.

    This is one question where just any picture will not do. You need to find an image that:

    1. is clear, so that students can clearly see what is happening (note that colour generally works best.
    2. has some element of action about it, meaning that students will be able say something about what might happen or is likely to happen to the characters in the picture.
    3. is interesting! What will stimulate the group that you are teaching?

    5 marks of the 45 are allocated for finding a good picture – the other 32 are for the lesson plan and the final 5 are for the evaluation questions at the end.

    In this question you can choose the time duration, the theme and the objective for your lesson. You can also select the age of your students and their level, so you have an excellent opportunity to shape the lesson to make it successful.

    You can focus on evidence or opinion, but you need to make sure that you provide good, clear examples for your students. What it to be the focus of the lesson? What theme is your predictions lesson going to be based upon? This may come from the picture itself.

    Think about the material that you will use in this lesson. The question asks you to have a look at predictions for opinions, evidence or both and you will not be penalised if you only decide to look at one form. But you need to put together a full lesson plan, and put a time to each activity to give your plan some balance.

    So identify the language structures that you will present in your lesson and ensure that the tasks you use enable students to practice them. For a basic outline of how to present a structure, refer back to the Presentation/Study/Practice model in Module 1.

    You may wish to look at both productive and receptive skills. In this way your students will be able to listen to or read the appropriate structures (receptive skills) and understand the meaning that is used. But if you add a productive stage to the plan as well, such as a writing or a speaking task, then your students will also be able to produce the target structures. This will give you a good idea as to whether the structure has been understood fully.

  • Can I pay for my online courses in instalments?

    Yes, you can. For an additional £20 fee (or other currency equivalent) trainees can pay for online courses in up to 6 equal instalments, when paying by credit or debit card only. Please select instalment payment from the options on the payment page when you apply for your course.  The first payment is taken on the date of enrolment, with following payments made at the same time in each of the following months.  Trainees should note they are contractually obliged to complete the instalment plan initiated and that trainees who fail to keep to the payment deadlines will be in breach of contract and risk being withdrawn from the course by Global English. We reserve the right to make recovery of monies owed and pass on relevant details to debt collection agencies as necessary. We do not offer payment by instalment facilities for weekend course programmes, TEFL/TESOL products or any versions of the course in beta. Certificates are not awarded until all payments have been completed.

  • Can I transfer my course from interactive to offline?

    Yes, upon certain conditions. Trainees are permitted to transfer between an offline and interactive course version providing:

    i)              the course has both interactive and offline versions available

    ii)             no questions that require marking by a tutor have been submitted prior to transfer request

    iii)            payment is made to reflect the difference in price if new course price is higher

    iv)            transfers take place within 14 days of course registration

    If the price of the course being transferred to is lower, the difference in price will be refunded, less a £25 or other currency administration fee.

    Transfers between different courses are not permitted. 

  • Can I take the interactive course and then have a hard copy of the material after I’ve completed?

    Yes you can, where we offer a choice between an interactive course and an offline version.

    We will happily send you the offline version study booklets at the end of the course. Just email the office at info@global-english.com when you complete. Currently there is no extra charge for this and we’ll send you the study materials in PDF form, which you can save to your computer and print off. (They will be in a slightly different order and format, but the essential material is all there, across larger modules for easier handling.)

    While you are on the course, you can take a screen print of any page at any time. You’ll also have access to the interactive course after you complete it until the time expires, where you’ll find it under the completed courses tab. Thereafter you can have access to any interactive course by extending your time.

    We offer unlimited access to the further research tab, which we will keep updated. This has all the links to other sites that that course points to so it's a great page to bookmark.

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